So – The first thing I did this morning on reading this New York Times article on Google’s new plan to use users’ data (+1s, etc…) on their own ads  was hunt around for how to opt out, which I have now done. To do the same visit your Google+ settings and change the setting for “Shared Endorsements” (nu-speak for “paste my face all over your ads on the web and don’t pay me anything for it.”). Since posting this, a some good discussion has been going on in the google+ comment trail.

I started the week with Mobile 2.0. Rudy De Waele and Mike Rowehl posted great summaries of that event with lots of links to coverage all over the Web which I won’t replicate here. Suffice to say: it was a great day. My one complaint was that I don’t think we served the developer community very well. Next time, we may need to expand the event into multiple tracks and get some real developer interest topics going. As for the Web 2.0 conference which is just closing down today, it has been a mixed bag, but on balance I actually think it was better than last year. Lots of the conference has been focusing on APIs and the whole “Web as a platform” concept, which I think is a key area of innovation in the Web. We’re already seeing how efforts like Amazon Web Services and Facebook’s APIs are creating waves of innovation and that’s only accelerating. I found Facebook’s announcement on allowing users to export their data particularly interesting. Openness like this will be the trend for social networks moving forward and Facebook has clearly decided to be a part of this disruption. Devil is in the details, of course. Of course, the mobile content at the summit has been very superficial and disappointing. The panel on mobile social media could have been interesting but it was a little too much Nokia-focused (how could it not be as it was sponsored and organized by Nokia and featured Anssi as a panelist). It still could have …

[Mobile|Web] 2.0 Week: From Mobility to Semantics Read more »

There are two particularly annoying bugs in the Nokia Series-60 (Webkit-based) Web Browser: Check-boxes don’t work. In order to “check” a check-box in a form and make it “stick,” you have to click it (so it appears checked), click it again (so it appears not checked) and then move the focus off of the check-box (at which point it will change its state back to checked). There is a big with the time or time-zone. I have not figured this one out, but on some pages times are misrepresented. In particular, on the “my itineraries” section of the British Airways web site, when I bring up an itinerary it shows me the times of the flights with a one hour off-set (as if I were in CET). The time zone of the phone is set correctly and the time on the phone reads correctly and the same web page brought up on a PC web browser shows the correct time. This bug could have been particularly disastrous for me as I was trying to book a car to the airport yesterday. I brought up my itinerary on the phone and was booking a taxi based on those times. Thanks to a thoughtful American Express employee who bothered to look up my flight numbers, I was saved from probably missing my flight. And while we’re on the subject of things that piss me off, why does Google (on Firefox on the Mac) insist on showing me pages (such as maps and docs) in German? I’m logged in. …

Annoying Bugs Read more »