The Web 2.0 Summit had an awful lot of content that didn’t really have much to do with … well … the Web. Besides the whole 700mhz spectrum issue, there was an awful lot of empasis on green tech. Now – I know green is cool. I have no issues with green stuff. However, it doesn’t seem to me there is much overlap between green tech and Web 2.0 — or rather if there is it wasn’t being explored at the Web 2.0 Summit. Was this tendency towards scope creep because there wasn’t enough to talk about at Web 2.0? I don’t think so. For example, the program could have tried to tackle the thorny issues around privacy and social networks, made even more accute by the proliferation of location-aware systems. There are about a hundred topics like this that should have been delved into in more detail. Instead what we got was a very uneven program with some really good bits and some material that frankly seemed more like advertorial. For example, the panel on the future of TV featured a very long presentation and demo by the CEO of Current.tv. Mike Volpi from Joost seemed a bit bemused by the whole thing and as much as said “well – I’m here to talk, not to demo Joost.” The conversation that ensued was quite interesting but could have gone more in-depth and featured more players as well (how about Daniel Graf from Kyte.tv)? In short, I wanted more debate, less pitch.

I started the week with Mobile 2.0. Rudy De Waele and Mike Rowehl posted great summaries of that event with lots of links to coverage all over the Web which I won’t replicate here. Suffice to say: it was a great day. My one complaint was that I don’t think we served the developer community very well. Next time, we may need to expand the event into multiple tracks and get some real developer interest topics going. As for the Web 2.0 conference which is just closing down today, it has been a mixed bag, but on balance I actually think it was better than last year. Lots of the conference has been focusing on APIs and the whole “Web as a platform” concept, which I think is a key area of innovation in the Web. We’re already seeing how efforts like Amazon Web Services and Facebook’s APIs are creating waves of innovation and that’s only accelerating. I found Facebook’s announcement on allowing users to export their data particularly interesting. Openness like this will be the trend for social networks moving forward and Facebook has clearly decided to be a part of this disruption. Devil is in the details, of course. Of course, the mobile content at the summit has been very superficial and disappointing. The panel on mobile social media could have been interesting but it was a little too much Nokia-focused (how could it not be as it was sponsored and organized by Nokia and featured Anssi as a panelist). It still could have …

[Mobile|Web] 2.0 Week: From Mobility to Semantics Read more »

I can’t believe it was almost a year ago that we ran the first Mobile 2.0 event. Mobile 2.0 was originally conceived last year as a meet-up for the mobilly minded ahead of the Web 2.0 Summit. It quickly turned into much more than that – an event in its own right that put the spotlight on innovation in the Mobile Web and mobile data space in general. I wrote a post before the event trying to put a definition together for Mobile 2.0. Why? Not because I care about creating a new meme (actually the Mobile 2.0 moniker was already been thrown around by many so all I was doing was trying to consolidate it a bit) but because I wanted to highlight a trend that I saw building in the mobile industry. That trend, which has only gathered pace over the past year, is all about the collision of the Mobile and Web industries. This collision is creating huge market disruption and huge opportunities for established and new players in both industries. Take Jaiku, for example. Five guys in Finland create a Twitter clone and the world shrugs. The Google folks who bought them understand that the value Jaiku brought was in the sophisticated way they weaved together the mobile and Web experience. Jaiku was in some ways a prototypical “Mobile 2.0 Company” – a next-generation service offering that brings together the Mobile with the Web in a seamless way such that the sum is greater than the parts. The Crowd at the Mobile …

Mobile 2.0 – T Minus 3 Days Read more »

The Mobile Discussion Originally uploaded by R.J. Friedlander. While I’m posting images from San Francisco week, here’s me at the Web 2.0 panel (“The Mobile Discussion”) with Om Malik and Ansi Vanjoki from Nokia. I’m saying “this is the future calling” right after Anssi talked about running Bittorrent on his N93. Om’s thinking “Why do I always get stuck with the weird ones?”